Veeam Vanguard Again in 2017

It has been a great day here because today I learned that I have once again been awarded acceptance into the excellent Veeam Vanguard program, my third time. This program, above any others that I am or have been involved with takes a more personal approach to creating a group of awardees who not only deserve anything good they get out of it but give back just as much to the community itself. In only its 3rd year the group has grown; from 31 the first year, 50(ish) the second, to a total of 62 this year. There are 21 new awardees in that 62 number so there really isn’t a rubber stamp to stay included, it is legitimately awarded each year. The group has grown each year but as you can see not by the leaps and bounds others have, and for good reason. There is no way this experience could be had with a giant community.

At this point in the post I would typically tell you a bit about what the Vanguard program is and isn’t but honestly, Veeam’s own Dmitry Kniazev really put it best in a couple recent posts, “Veeam Vanguard Part 1: WTH Is This?” and “Veeam Vanguard Part 2: What It’s Not.”  What I will add is that as nice as some of the perks are, as DK says in the Part 1 post the true perk is the intangibles; a vibrant community full of some of the smartest, most passionate people in the industry and in many cases access right to the people approving and disapproving changes to their software. These are the thing that made me sweat approval time.

Once again I would give a giant thank you to Veeam Software and especially the whole Vanguard crew. This includes Rick Vanover, Clint Wyckoff, Michael White, Michael Cade, Anthony Spiteri, Kirsten Stoner, Dmitry Kniazev, Andrew Zhelezko and finally Doug Hazelman. Without these people it wouldn’t be nearly as nice.

Lots of new stuff coming from Veeam

Veeam had what they called “THEIR BIGGEST EVENT EVER” and while it at times did seem to be really heavy on the sales for the sake of sales pitch, there was a lot of stuff to legitimately be excited about for those of us who use their products. From the features coming in Veeam Backup & Replication in version 9.5 in a couple of months through the first new feature of next year’s version 10 all in total there were 5 major announcements here today that those of us using the product can make use of. In this post I’m going to run briefly through these and in the coming months will provide some deeper insights when possible.

Veeam Backup & Replication / Veeam ONE 9.5 (October 2016)

  • Nimble Storage Integration- Nimble with be the next vendor after EMC, NetApp and HP storage systems that will allow Veeam to interact at the array level, allowing for backups from snapshot. If you are a Nimble customer (like me) this is going to be some good stuff
  • Advanced usage of Windows Server 2016 ReFS- This is the real gravy here for anybody who is having to work with any kind of synthetic operations with their backup files. Through an integration Veeam has with Microsoft when ReFS is used to back your Veeam repositories your weekly rollups are going to take a heck of a lot less time and as well as see less storage consumption for long terms “weekly fulls”.  This is due to ReFS’ basic mechanism where file copies and moves never actually move data, it just moves the pointers. An example I’ve seen is on a 10 GB change rate backup the weekly full went from 35 minutes on NTFS to 5 minutes on ReFS. Now move that out to a real production dataset and you are really talking about something. There will be a lot more of this in follow-up posts.
  • Direct Restore to Microsoft Azure – If you are resource constrained (which you usually are in a situation where you need a restore) Veeam now has the ability to restore a VM (even if it is vSphere based) directly to Azure. Pretty cool and I think probably the first of what we’ll see on this thread
  • vCloud Director Integration
  • VeeamONE 9.5 – If your organization needs to work with charge back this is something that is directly supported in VeeamONE. If you haven’t played with VeeamONE yet, please do so, I’ve yet to meet anyone who hasn’t found one problem with VeeamONE when first installed in their virtualization environment

Veeam Agents (November-December 2016)
agent versions

Expanding on the Veeam Endpoint for Windows (and now Linux) Veeam has come out with a Veeam Agents for Windows and Linux product. While Endpoint is and will still be available for standalone installations, we finally have an enterprise managed version we’ve been looking for and we truly can have one centrally managed Veeam installation for our virtual, physical and workstation backups. As you can see there’s still a lot to like about the Free version including the new ability to restore directly to Azure or Hyper-V, the paid versions give us server grade capabilities such as Application-aware processing and transaction log processing. Further one I’m excited about as part of my use case for this is for my mobile workforce is the ability for workstations and remote office servers to cache their backups locally when they aren’t connected to the Internet and then ship them back to the corporate office or Cloud Connect repository when once again connected. This is good stuff that has been a long time coming.

Veeam Availability Console (Q1 2017)

I truly want to believe this is the first edge of “one UI to rule them all”, but the Veeam Availability Console is a web-based console to let you monitor and manage all of your Veeam resources; VBR, Agent, Cloud Connect, etc. This is an evolution of the managed backup portal available to Service Providers for a bit now and allows it to be moved downstream to the Enterprise. Let me  reinforce the emphasis on the Enterprise, while included in licensing you are going to have to be so big of an organization/installation to be allowed access to it. Hopefully as subsequent versions are released that will trickle down more.

Veeam Availability Orchestrator (Q1 2017, beta soon)

Veeam for a DevOpsy world. VAO will allow you to automate many of the processes you need to do with Veeam based upon your disaster recovery plan. Let’s say your plan requires you do so many backups, so many replicas, regular testing and comply with documentation practices. Orchestrator is going to allow you to take all that on paper and define it in workflows so in theory you are always in compliance, and if you aren’t have the documentation to show you where you aren’t. I’ve seen quite a few things about this, things that are going to be available to everybody to test soon, and they are all very powerful things.

Veeam Office 365 E-mail Backup (Q4 2016)

Of the new products announce this is the biggie. For those of us who have already began or have done Exchange migrations to Office 365, Veeam now has the ability to backup those mailboxes to your local repositories so that you always know that data is there. I don’t know how those conversations have gone for you but this is a major pain point for us in going to the cloud. Pricing or even how it is going to be sold still isn’t set but what is known is that when released the end of this year it will be free for a year for all Veeam customers with an active support contract and for 3 years for those with Enterprise Plus licensing.

Again, while I have no knowledge that it will happen I have to believe this is the first baby step into a whole host of things to make our cloudy life better in the future with Sharepoint, OneDrive and anything else coming down the road.

Veeam Backup & Replication integration with IBM storage (????, preview May 2017)

Finally the last announcement was the first related to Veeam Backup version 10, in this case the next storage vendor integration. This integration is going to work with any IBM product based on their Spectrum Virtualize software and should work like any other of their integrations. With this we also go to learn that the first technical preview of v10 will coincide with VeeamON 2017 in New Orleans, so mid May 2017.

VMworld 2015: What We Know So Far

As the first general keynote is wrapping up here in San Francisco I’ve been trying to keep track of what’s been announced this morning both in the keynote but also by way of the blogsphere. Long story short my take is there isn’t any thing new for the traditional vSphere customer, but if you are ready to start moving some of those workloads to the cloud there is going to be plenty of new things to enable what VMware is calling the hybrid cloud (repeatedly); the ability to support both your legacy apps (you know what we’re actually using) as well the new, shiny cloud native apps your developers are deploying at the speed of light.

Please forgive the notes based format found below, but I wanted to get the information out there.

Announcements so far:

  • Picture2-1024x475EVO SDDC Manager
    • “Single Pain of Glass for managing all the hardware in your datacenter racks including
      • EVO:Rail for compute, storage
      • Partner networking devices for management, spine and top of rack
      • Rack power distribution
      • Covers vRealize Suite, NSX 6.2, VSAN 6.1, vSphere 6
    • Is this the EVO:Rack they hinted at last year?
    • http://www.vmware.com/radius/vmworld-2015-the-end-of-the-beginning-lets-go/
  • Vmware Integrated OpenStack 2
    • Updates to the Kilo release, enabling features including
      • Expanded language support
      • Multi-region, multi-hypervisor support
      • Load Balancing as a Service
      • Autoscaling
  • vSphere Integrated Containers & Photon Support
    • Enables the truly hybrid cloud, with Photon/Bonneville/ESXi handling life under vCenter and Photon Machine powering your Cloud Native Apps
  • Project SkyScraper; hybrid cloud capabilities for vSphere allowing for extending DC to public cloud while supporting on premises standard concerns like security and business continuity ideas
    • Cross Cloud vMotion & content sync between on-prem and vCloud Air
    • vCloud Air Hybrid Cloud Manager- free download behind fee based capability
  • NSX 6.2 update allowing for deeper integration with the physical devices below it
    • Allows for the microsegmentation of physical servers, big differentiator past when compared to Cisco ACI
    • Will need partners, not known at this point but I’m guessing not Cisco
    • Also now supports cross vCenter vMotion over VXLAN
    • Has a TraceFlow capability allowing visability to what data is passing through
    • Announced late last week that there are now over 700 NSX customers, about double what was announced at Vmworld last year
    • Greater reliability through support for a secondary NSX manager that will take over if the primary fails
    • http://www.crn.com/news/networking/300077934/vmware-gets-physical-with-latest-nsx-software-defined-networking-update.htm
  • VSAN 6.1
    • 3rd total release
    • VSAN Stretched Cluster support, can now have geographically diverse clusters with synchronous replication between sites
    • VSAN for ROBO- Seems interesting, can have large number of 2 node VSAN clusters at your Remote Offices that are then centrally managed through vCenter.
      • Does it make use of stretched cluster for for data protection per site?
    • Now supports native Windows and Oracle clustering methods, WSFC and RAC
    • New high performance hardware supportd in ULLtra DIMM SSDs and NVM interfaces
    • New management features such as a Web Client Health Check plugin for VSAN and a management pack for vROPS
  • SRM 6.1
    • Stretched Cluster as well, seems to be the theme this year
    • Storage Policy Protection Groups; uses tags 1. tag a VM; 2. tag a datastore; protect the datastore with SRM
    • http://www.viktorious.nl/2015/08/31/vmworld-2015-srm-6-1-whats-new-stretched-cluster-support-and-more/
  • Other:
    • vSphere Content Library will be able to sync content between on-prem and vCloud Air bidirectionally
    • Vmware identity services, VMW’s assault on Active Directory

Proud to be a Veeam Vanguard

On July 27th Rick Vanover over on the Veeam Blog announced the inaugural class of what is known as the Veeam Vanguard of which I am honored to have been selected as a member. What the heck is a Veeam Vanguard? While best described in Rick’s announcement blog post, my take is that this group is composed of members of the IT and virtualization global community who are Veeam users and go above and beyond in sharing their knowledge of the ins and outs of the various Veeam products.  Frankly I am flabbergasted to be named and wish to thank them for the nomination.

Without getting too gushy or fanboyish, I have found over the years that Veeam’s products tend to solve problems we all deal with in a virtualized world. Backup & Replication especially had made my day in, day out life easier because I know my data is nice and protected and I can test just about anything I want to do without effecting the production environment.

In closing I just want to say congrats to all of the other nominees and that I look forward to seeing what you have to share. To say the group is geographically diverse is an understatement as Veeam was ever so nice to include the nationalities of all members, it’s very cool to see so many flags represented. Many included I’ve followed on twitter and the blogspace for quite some time, while are others are new to me but in the end I’m sure there will be some great knowledge shared and I look forward to getting to know you.

What’s New in vSphere 6: Licensing

Today's release of vSphere 6 brings about quite a few new technologies worth getting excited for. This includes things such as Virtual Volumes (VVOLs), Open Stack Integration, global content library and long distance vMotion. Now for many of us, especially in the SMB space, the question is can we afford to play with them. As usual VMware very quietly released the licensing level breakout of these and other new features and I have to say my first take is this is another case of the rich getting richer.

If you are already Enterprise Plus level licensed you are in great shape as everything discussed today except VSAN is included. Specifically this includes

  • cross vCenter/ long distance vCenter
  • Content Library
  • vGPU
  • VMware Integrated OpenStack

While that's great and all and I applaud their development, they have quite a few other licensing levels that have been left out. Personally my installations are done at either Standard or Enterprise levels. The only major feature with across the product line support is VVOLs, which is nice but I honestly expected them to at least move some version 5 features such as Storage DRS down a notch to the Enterprise level and I figured the Content Library would maybe come in at the Essentials Plus level or Enterprise.

As Mr. Geitner alluded to in his talk about half of all vSphere licenses are Enterprise Plus, my guess is the company really want to see that number grow. Here's to hoping that like vRAM this recent trend of heavily loading features into the highest level is a trend that will be quickly rectified because I think this is going to be just as popular.

 

 

VMware’s Big February 2nd Announcement

VMware will be having a big announcement event next week, most likely regarding the public release of their vSphere 6 suite of products. Version 6 has been in a “private” beta that anyone can join for the past 5 months or so and looks to include various features to move the product along. The beta program is still open for enrollment with the latest version being an RC build, you can sign up here to gain access to the bits themselves but also various documents and recorded webinars regarding the new features.

Just going by what was discussed at VMworld 2014 what is included in this version includes

  • Virtual Volumes: A VMware/Storage vendor interoperability technology that masks much of the complexity of storage management from the vSphere administrator and makes the storage more virtualization-centric than it already is. There is a lot of information out there on this already available through the power of Google, but the product announcement on the VMware blogs is nice and concise.
  • The death of the fat VI Client: This is the release where we are supposed to be going whole hog on the vSphere Web Client. Can you feel the enthusiasm I have for this?
  • vMotion Enhancements: One feature really worth getting worked up for is the ability to across the both vCenters and datacenters, neither of which was possible in the past. This is great news.
  • Multi-CPU VM Fault Tolerance: While the fault tolerance feature, the ability to have in essence a replica of protected VMs on separate hosts within your datacenter, has been around for years it has been relegated to the also featured category due to some pretty stringent requirements for VMs to be protected in this manner. In vSphere 6 the ability to protect VMs with multiple CPUs will finally be supported.

In any case the announcement will be available for all to attend online. You can register to attend the event at VMware’s website.