Making Managing Printers Manageable With Security Groups and Group Policy

I don’t know about the rest of you but printing has long been the bane of my existence as an IT professional. Frankly, I hate it and believe the world should be 100% paperless by this point. That said, throughout my career, my users have done a wonderful job of showing me that I am truly in the minority on this matter so I have to do my part in making sure they are available. As any Windows SysAdmin knows installing the actual print driver and setting up a TCP/IP port aren’t even half the battle. From there you got to get them shared and have the users actually connect to them so that they can use them. It’d be awesome if they would all just sit down say “I have no printers, let me go to Active Directory and find some” but I’ve yet to have more than a handful of users who see this as a solution; they just want the damned things there and ready to rock and roll. In the past, I’ve always managed this with a series of old VBS scripts, which still works but requires tweaks from time to time. It’s possible to do this kind of stuff with Powershell these days as well as long as your user has the Active Directory module imported (Hint: they probably don’t). There are also any number of other 3rd party and really expensive Microsoft systems (Hi SCCM!) that will do this as well. But luckily we’ve …

Updating the Photo Attributes in Active Directory with Powershell

Today I got to have the joys of needed to once again get caught up on importing employee photos into the Active Directory photo attributes, thumbnailPhoto and jpegPhoto. While this isn’t exactly the most necessary thing on Earth it does make working in a Windows environment “pretty” as these images are used by things such as Outlook, Lync and Cisco Jabber among other. In the past the only way I’ve only ever known how to do this is by using the AD Photo Edit Free utility, which while nice tends to be a bit buggy and it requires lots of repetitive action as you manually update each user for each attribute. This year I’ve given myself the goal of 1) finally learning Powershell/PowerCLI to at least the level of mild proficiency and 2) automating as many tasks like this as possible. While I’ve been dutifully working my way through a playlist of great PluralSight courses on the subject, I’ve had to live dangerously a few times to accomplish tasks like this along the way. So long story short with some help along the way from Googling things I’ve managed to put together a script to do the following. Look in a directory passed to the script via the jpgdir parameter for any images with the file name format <username>.jpg Do an Active Directory search in an OU specified in the ou parameter for the username included in the image name. This parameter needs to be the full DN path (ex. LDAP://ou=staff,dc=foo,dc=com) …