Setting Up External Access To A Veeam SureBackup Virtual Lab

Hey y’all, happy Friday! One of the things that seems to still really fly under the radar in regards to Veeam Backup & Replication is its SureBackup feature. This feature is designed to allow for automated testing via scripts of groups of your backups. An example would be if you have a critical web application. You can create an application group that includes both the database server and the web server and when the SureBackup job is run Veeam will connect a section of its backup repository to a specified ESXi host as a datastore and, start the VMs within a NAT protected segment of your vSphere infrastructure, run either the role based scripts included or custom ones you specify to ensure that the VMs are connecting to the applications correctly, and then when done shut the lab down and fire off an e-mail. That workflow is great an all but it only touches on the edge of the power of what SureBackup can do for you. In our environment not only do we have a mandate to provide backup tests that allow for end-user interaction, but we also use SureBackup for test bed type applications such as patch tests. An example of the latter here is when I was looking to upgrade our internal Windows-based CA to Server 2012 R2. I was able to launch the server in the lab, perform the upgrade and ensure that it behaved as expected WITHOUT ANY IMPACT ON PRODUCTION first and then tear down …

Veeam Backup Repository Best Practices Session Notes

After a couple days off I’m back to some promised VeeamON content. A nice problem that VeeamON had this year is the session choices were much more diverse and there were a lot more of them. Unfortunately this led to some overlap of some really great sessions. A friend of mine, Jaison Bailey of vBrisket fame and fortune, got tied up in another session and was unable to attend what I considered one of the best breakout sessions all week, Anton Gostev‘s Backup Repository Best Practices so he asked me to post my notes. For those not too familiar with Veeam repos they can essentially be any manner of addressable disk space, whether local, DAS, NAS, SAN or even cloud, but when you start taking performance into account you have to get much more specific. Gostev, who is the Product Manager for Backup & Replication, lines out the way to do it right. Anyway, here’s the notes including links to information when possible. Any notations I have are in bold and italicized. Don’t underestimate the importance of Performance Performance issues may impact RTOs Five Factors of choosing Storage Reliability Fast backups Fast restores DR from complete storage loss Lowest Cost Ultimate backup Architecture Fast, reliable primary storage for fastest backups, then backup copy to Secondary storage both onsite AND offsite Limit number of RP on primary, leverage cheap secondary Selectively create offsite copies to tape, dr site, or cloud Best Repo: Low End Any Windows or Linux Server Can also serve …

Setting Up Endpoint Backup Access to Backup & Replication 8 Update 2 Repositories

A part of the Veeam Backup & Replication 8 Update 2 Release is the ability to allow users to target repositories specified in your Backup Infrastructure as targets for Endpoint Backup. While this is just one of many, many fixes and upgrades (hello vSphere 6!) in Update 2 this one is important for those looking to use Endpoint Backup in the enterprise as it allows for centralized storage and management and equally important is you also get e-mail notifications on these jobs. Once the update is installed you’ll have to decide what repository or repositories will be available to Endpoint Backup and provide permissions for users to access them. By default every Backup Repository Denies Endpoint Backup access to everyone. To change this for one or more repositories you’ll need to: Access the Backup Repositories section under Backup Infrastructure, then right click a repository and choose “Permissions.” Once there you have three options for each repository in regards to Endpoint permissions; Deny to everyone (default), Allow to everyone, and Allow to the following users or groups only. This last option is the most granular and what I use, even if just to select a large group. In the example shown I’ve provided access to the Domain Admins group. You will also notice that I’ve chosen to encrypt any backups stored in the repository, a nice feature as well of Veeam Backup & Replication 8. Also of note is that no user will be able to select a repository until they have access …

Top New Features in Veeam Backup & Replication v8

We are now a couple of months out from the release of version 8 of Veeam Software’s flagship product Backup & Replication. Since then we’ve seen the first patch release a couple of weeks after, almost a Veeam tradition, and I’ve had it deployed and running for a while now. In that time I’ve found a lot to really like in the new version. End to End Encryption Backup & Replication now has the ability to encrypt your backup data from the moment it leaves your production storage system, through the LAN and WAN traffic and once it is at rest, either on disk or tape. This encryption is protected by password stored both with humans as well as within the Enterprise Manager database keeping you from losing backups. Finally the encryption does not change ratios for either compression or deduplication of the backup data. Resource Conservation Improvements Quite a few of the new Backup & Replication features are geared towards keeping your RPO goals from getting in the way of production efficiency. First and foremost is the availability of Backup I/O Control, a feature that will monitor the latency of your production storage system and if measured metrics climb above a user defined level will throttle backup operations to return systems to acceptable levels. On the networking side if you have redundant or other none production WAN links you now have the ability to specify preferred networks for backup data, with failover to production if it isn’t available. Further …

Getting Started with Veeam Backup & Replication v7

Come one, come all virtualization geeks, the latest installment of Veeam‘s excellent Backup & Replication suite has arrived.  As noted in lots of places, v7 boasts a boatload of new and new-to-them features that the community has been requesting for some time.  Among these are a few that I am quite excited about as they should in theory make my job as an admin easier; built in WAN acceleration, support for tape libraries, a vSphere Web Client Plugin, and the ability to create backup copy jobs to support your basic Grandfather-Father-Son backup strategy without external help. Among the biggies are: Built in WAN acceleration * – will be great for me, I’ll only need to take one backup of each VM a night now (didn’t like the rsync or xcopy methods). Ability to take backups from storage snapshots * (as long as you have HP Storage devices)- According to Veeam, should be high performance, capable of near continuous data protection without impacting production performance Plugin for the vSphere Web Client * – manage Veeam directly from within the vSphere Web Client Self Service Recovery * – Let them eat cake! Tape Library Support – Straight to tape from Veeam as long as it can directly see it.  This has been requested for a while Virtual Labs for Hyper-V – Us VMware guys don’t get to have all the fun now, you can now sandbox and test backups in Hyper-V now too. Parallel Processing of VMs and disks within VMs Backup Copy …