Fixing the SSL Certificate with Project Honolulu

So if you haven’t heard of it yet Microsoft is doing some pretty cool stuff in terms of Local Server management in what they are calling Project Honolulu. The latest version, 1802, was released March 1, 2018, so it is as good a time as any to get off the ground with it if you haven’t yet. If you’ve worked with Server Manager in versions newer than Windows Server 2008 R2 then the web interface should be comfortable enough that you can feel your way around so this post won’t be yet another “cool look at Project Honolulu!” but rather it will help you with a hiccup in getting it up and running well. I was frankly a bit amazed that this is evidently a web service from Microsoft not built upon IIS. As such your only GUI based opportunity to get the certificate right is during installation, and that is based on the thumbprint at that, so still not exactly user-friendly. In this post, I’m going to talk about how to find that thumbprint in a manner that copies well (as opposed to opening the certificate) and then replacing the certificate on an already up and running Honolulu installation. Giving props where they do this post was heavily inspired by How to Change the Thumbprint of a Certificate in Microsoft Project Honolulu by Charbel Nemnom. Step 0: Obtain a certificate: A good place to start would be to obtain or import a certificate to the server where you’ve installed …

Support Adobe Digital ID Signing with Automated Microsoft CA User Certificate Generation

Just a quick how to, wanting to document a task I have recently had need of. This process has a perquisite of you having a Microsoft Certificate Authority already available in your environment. Start > Run >mmc Add Remove Snap-ins and choose the following – Certificate Authority (when prompted add the name of your CA) – Certificate Templates – Group Policy Management In Certificate Templatesright click on “User” and choose “Duplicate Template” Set compatibility settings as needed. If you have a 2008 R2 pure Active Directory environment make it match. In terms of Certificate Recipient make it match the oldest OS you have in use. Under General Change the Name to something meaningful as you’ll be referencing it later. Under the Security Tab set Domain Users to have both Enroll and Autoenroll permissions In Certificate Authorityright click on the “Certificate Templates”subfolder and choose New> “Certificate Template to Issue” Choose your newly created Certificate Template In Group Policy Management we are going to do a couple of things; setup your domain for certificate auto enrollmentand also define registry settings for Adobe Acrobat and Acrobat Reader. In any GPO that will hit the users you wish to have certificates (Default Domain Policy for example) choose to edit. Navigate to User Configuration> Windows Settings> Security Settings> Public Key Policies Double click on Certificate Services Client- Auto-Enrollment and set – Configuration Model: Enabled – Check Renew expired certificates… – Check Update certificates that use certificate templates – Hit OK By default Adobe Acrobat and …

Quick Config: Install ClamAV & configure a daily scan on CentOS 6

I’m pretty well versed in the ways of Anti-Virus in Windows but I’ve wanted to get an AV engine installed on my Linux boxes for a while now. In looking around I’ve found a tried and true option in ClamAV and after a few stops and starts was able to get something usable. I’d still like to figure out how to have it send me a report by e-mail if it finds something but that’s for another day; I don’t have enough Linux in my environment to necessitate me putting the time in for that. So with that here’s how to quickly get started. Step 0: If not already there, install the EPEL repository

Step 1: Install ClamAV

Step 2: Perform the 1st update of ClamAV definitions (this will happen daily by default afterwards)

Step 3: Enable and Start Services

Step 4: Configure Daily Cron Job I chose to have it scan the whole system and only report infected files, you may want to do differently

Enter the following:

Note the -i option tells it to only return infected files, the -r tells it to recursively search. You may want to add the –remove option as well to remove files that are seen as infected. Step 6: Make Cron Job Executable

You can then kick of a manual scan if you’d like using

That’s it! pretty simple and all of your output will be logged daily to the /var/log/clamav/daily_clamscan.log file for review.