Reinstalling the Veeam Backup & Replication Powershell SnapIn

As somebody who lives by the old mantra of “Eat your own dog food” when it comes to the laptops I use both personally and professionally I tend to be on the early edge of installs. So while I am not at all ready to start deploying Windows 10 1803 to the end users I’ve recently upgraded my Surface Pro to it. In doing so I’ve found that doing so broke access to the Veeam Powershell SnapIn on my laptop when trying to run a script. After some Googling I found a very helpful post on the Veeam Forums that I thought I’d condense the commands to run here for us all. Let me start with a hat tip to James McGuire for finding this solution to the problem. For the those that aren’t familiar with VBR’s Powershell capabilities, the SnapIn is installed either when you run the full installer on your VBR server or, as is my case when you install the Remote Console component on another Windows system. Don’t let me get started about the fact that Veeam is still using a SnapIn to provide PowerShell access, that’s a whole different post, but this is where we are. The sign that this has occurred is when you get the “Get-PSSnapin : No Windows PowerShell snap-ins matching the pattern ‘VeeamPSSnapin’ were found.” error when trying to get access to the SnapIn. In order to fix this, you need to use the installutil.exe utility in your latest .Net installation. So …

Cisco Voice Servers Version 11.5 Could Not Load modules.dep

About 6 months ago we updated 3/4 of our Cisco Telephony environment from 8.5 to 11.5. The only reason we didn’t do it all is because UCCX 11.5 wasn’t out yet so it went to 11. While there were a few bumps in the road; resizing VMs, some COP files, etc. the update went well. Unfortunately once it was done we starting having a glorious issue where after a reboot the servers sometimes failed to boot, presenting “FATAL: Could not load /lib/modules/2.6.32-573.18.1.el6.x86_64/modules.dep: No such file or directory”. Any way you put it, this sucked. The first time this happened I call TAC and while they had seen it, they had no good answer except for rebuild the VM, restore from backup. Finally after the 3rd time (approximately 3 months after install) the bug had been officially documented and (yay) it included a work around. The good news is that the underlying issue at this point has been fixed in 11.5(1.11900.5) and forward so if you are already there, no problems. The issue lies with the fact that the locked down build of RHEL 6 that any of the Cisco Voice server platforms are built on don’t handle VMware Tools updates well. It’s all good when you perform a manual update from their CLI and use their “utils vmtools refresh” utility, but many organizations, mine included, choose to make life easier and enable vCenter Update Manager to automatically upgrade the VMware tools each time a new version is available and the VM is …

Fixing Domain Controller Boot in Veeam SureBackup Labs

We’ve been dealing with an issue for past few runs of our monthly SureBackup jobs where the Domain Controller boots into Safe Mode and stays there. This is no good because without the DC booting normally you have no DNS, no Global Catalog or any of the other Domain Controller goodness for the rest of your servers launching behind it in the lab. All of this seems to have come from a change in how domain controller recover is done in Veeam Backup and Replication 9.0, Update 2 as discussed in a post on the Veeam Forums. Further I can verify that if you call Veeam Support you get the same answer as outlined here but there is no public KB about the issue. There are a couple of ways to deal with this, either each time or permanently, and I’ll outline both in this post. The booting into Safe Mode is totally expected, as a recovered Domain Controller object should boot into Directory Services Restore mode the first time. What is missing though is that as long as you have the Domain Controller box checked for the VM in your application group setup then once booted Veeam should modify the boot setup and reboot the system before presenting it to you as a successful launch. This in part explains why when you check the Domain Controller box it lengthens the boot time allowed from 600 seconds to 1800 seconds by default. On the Fly Fix If you are like …

Installing .Net 3.5 on Server 2012/ Windows 8 and above

Hi all, just a quick post to serve as both a reminder to me and hopefully something helpful for you. For some reason Microsoft has decided to make installing .Net 3.5 on anything after Windows Server 2012 (or Windows 8 on the client side) harder than it has to be. While it is included in the regular Windows Features GUI it is not included in the on-disk sources for features to be installed automatically. In a perfect world you just choose to source from Windows Update and go about your day, but in my experience this is a hit or miss solution as many times for whatever reason it errors out when attempting to access. The fix is to install via the Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool better known as DISM and provide a local source for the file. .Net 3.5 is included in every modern Windows CD/ISO under the sources\sxs directory. When I do this installation I typically use the following command set from an elevated privilege command line or PowerShell window:

When done the window should look like the window to the left. Pretty simple, right? While this is all you really need to know to get it installed let’s go over what all these parameters are that you just fed into your computer. /online – This refers to the idea that you are changing the installed OS as opposed to an image /enable-feature – the is the CLI equivalent of choosing Add Roles and Features from …

The Basics of Network Troubleshooting

The following post is something I wrote as an in-house primer for our help desk staff. While it a bit down level from a lot of the content here I find more and more the picking and reliably going with a troubleshooting methodology is somewhat of a lost art. If you are just getting started in networking or are troubleshooting connectivity issues at your home or SMB this would be a great place to start. We often get issues which are reported as application issues but end up being network related. There are a number steps and logical thought processes that can make dealing with even the most difficult network issues easy to troubleshoot. The purpose of this post is to outline many of the basic steps of troubleshooting network issues, past that it’s time to reach out and ask for assistance. Understand the basics of OSI model based troubleshooting The conceptual idea of how a network operates within a single node (computer, smartphone, printer, etc.) is defined by something called the OSI reference model. The OSI model breaks down the operations of a network into 7 layers, each of which is reliant on success at the layers below it (inbound traffic) and above it (outbound traffic). The layers (with some corresponding protocols you’ll recognize) are: 7. Application: app needs to send/receive something (HTTP, HTTPS, FTP, anything that the user touches and begins/ends network transmission) 6. Presentation: formatting & encryption (VPN and DNS host names) 5. Session: interhost communication (nothing …

Quieting the LogPartitionLowWaterMarkExceeded Beast in Cisco IPT 9.0.x Products

As a SysAdmin I’m used to waking up, grabbing my phone and seeing the 20 or so e-mails that  the various systems and such have sent me over night, gives me an idea of how the day will go and what I need start with. Every so often though you get that morning where the 20 becomes 200 and you just want to roll over and go back to bed. This morning I had about 200, the vast majority of which was from my Cisco Unified Contact Center Express server with the subject “LogPartitionLowWaterMarkExceeded.” Luckily I’ve had this before and know what to do with it but on the chance you are getting it too here’s what it means and how to deal with it in an efficient manner. WTF Is This?!? Or at least that was my response the first time I ran into this. If you are a good little voice administrator one of the first things you do when installing your phone system or taking one over due to job change is setup the automatic alerting capability in the Cisco Unified Real Time Monitoring Tool (or RTMT, you did install that, right?) so that when things go awry you know in theory before the users do. One of the downsides to this system is it is an either on or off alerting system meaning what ever log events are saved within the system are automatically e-mailed at the same frequency. This particular error message is the by-product of a …