VMworld 2017 US: T -2

I write this while traveling to sunny and amazingly hot Las Vegas for the 2017 edition of VMworld US. I hope to provide feedback and news throughout the conference, highlighting not only the excellent content and programs but also the best the virtualization community has to offer. Today will be a travel day as well as a day to meet up with friends, new and old. Tomorrow, the Sunday before the conference, is when the real fun begins with things like Opening Acts for me, TAM and partner content for others as well as a number of social events. What We Know So Far Yesterday was the day that Vmware went on a killing spree, announcing the depreciation of Windows based vCenter, the flash based vSphere web client and the vmkLinux APIs and its associated driver ecosystem. All of these enter the depreciated state with the next major version of vSphere and then will be gone for ever and ever in the revision after that. Each of these are significant steps towards the evolution of vSphere as we know it, and when coupled with the advances in PowerCLI in version 6.5 the management of our in house infrastructure has been changed for the better. These announcements came rapid fire on the Friday before Vmworld with the death of the Windows based vCenter coming first. As we have had versions of varying success of the vCenter Server Appliances (VCSA) for over 5 years now it’s been a long time coming. I …

A VMworld US 2017 To Do List

If you work in the virtualization or datacenter field (are they really different anymore?) you probably know that VMworld US 2017 is next week, August 27-31. While VMware may not be the only option out there when it comes to virtualization anymore VMworld is still the defacto event for people in the field. This conference’s definition of community is unrivaled in scope with just as much if not more going on outside of the conference agenda as  in it. As with all things worth doing conference attendance probably needs a checklist. Have you done yours? If not here are the high points of mine. I’m not going to bore you with “Jim will be attending session so and so”; well except for VMTN6699U and VMTN6700U you should totally join me at those sessions, but these are pretty general things I try to do each time. Take Your Vitamins– I hate to say it but the Vegas Flu is a real thing. Between being in the recirculated air of a jumbo jet for any number of hours to bookend event and being in the recirculated air of a Vegas hotel/casino/conference center I always seem to get at least a mild head cold at some point during the week. Start about now taking whatever version of Vitamin C supplement you like and do so throughout the event to help head this issue off. Bring Sharable Power- The average conference attendee has 3 devices on them at all times, phone, tablet and laptop. …

Learning To Pick The Right Tech Conference at vBrisket- TOMORROW!

Hey all, just a quick post to mention that the fine folks at vBrisket will be having a get together February 24th at 2 PM at Grist House Craft Brewery in Pittsburgh. If you work in the virtualization industry and haven’t heard of vBrisket yet you should get to know them because they have a great thing going.  vBrisket takes the typical User Group back to its vendor independence roots, allowing you to focus more on your general virtualization career and less on the path of any particular vendor. At the same time it gives Clint, Gabe, Jaison, and John a great reason to bring out the smokers and prepare enough meat to feed a brewery full of techies. I’m honored to have been invited to join the panel discussion this time. The topic is “Tech Conferences – What are the right ones for you?” This will be moderated by the vBrisket team and includes myself, John White, Mike Muto, and Justin Paul. As I see my attendance at various conferences as a big driver in the success of my career and my growth as a technology worker I’m excited to be included. Of course this meeting wouldn’t be possible without the sponsorship from Zerto. At the meeting they’ll be talking I’m sure about their new conference, ZertoCON in Boston May 22-24th. So if you are in the Pittsburgh area tomorrow and would like to attend just be there at 2, I look forward to meeting up!

Windows Server Deduplication, Veeam Repositories, and You!

Backup, among other things, is very good at creating multiple copies of giant buckets of data that don’t change much and tend to sit for long periods of time. Since we are in modern times, we have a number of technologies to deal with this problem, one of which is called deduplication with quite a few implementations of it. Microsoft has had server-based storage versions since Windows 2008 R2 that has gotten better with each release, but as any technology still has its pitfalls to be mindful of. In this post I’m going to look a very specific use case of Windows server deduplication, using it as the storage beneath your Veeam Backup and Replication repositories, covering some basic tips to keep your data healthy and performance optimized. What is Deduplication Anyway? For those that don’t work with it much imagine you had a copy of War and Peace stored as a Word document with an approximate file size 1 MB. Each day for 30 days you go into the document and change 100 KB worth of the text in the document and save it as a new file on the same volume. With a basic file system like NTFS this would result in you having 31 MB tied up in the storage of these files, the original and then the full file size of each additional copy. Now let’s look at the same scenario on a volume with deduplication enabled. The basic idea of deduplication replaces identical blocks of …

Fun with the vNIC Shuffle with Cisco UCS

Here at This Old Datacenter we’ve recently made the migration to using Cisco UCS for our production compute resources. UCS offers a great number of opportunity for system administrators, both in deployment as well as on going maintenance, making updating the physical as manageable as we virtualization admins are getting used to with the virtualized layer of the DC. Of course like any other deployment there is always going to be that one “oh yeah, that” moment. In my case after I had my servers up I realized I needed another virtual NIC, or vNIC in UCS world. This shouldn’t be a big deal because a big part of what UCS does for you is it abstracts the hardware configuration away from the actual hardware. For those more familiar with standard server infrastructure, instead of having any number of physical NIC in the back of the host for specific uses (iSCSI, VM traffic, specialized networking, etc) you have a smaller number of connections as part of the Fabric Interconnect to the blade chassis that are logically split to provide networking to the individual blades. These Fabric Interconnects (FI) not only have multiple very high-speed connections (10 or 40 GbE) but each chassis typically will have multiple FI to provide redundancy throughout the design. All this being said, here’s a very basic design utilizing a UCS Mini setup with Nexus 3000 switches and a copper connected storage array: So are you starting to thing this is a UCS geeksplainer? No, no …

Getting Started with rConfig on CentOS 7

I’ve been a long time user of RANCID for change management on network devices but frankly it’s always left me feeling a little bit of a pain to use and not particularly modern. I recently decided it was time for my OpenNMS/RANCID server to be rebuilt, moving OpenNMS up to a CentOS 7 installation and in doing so thought it was time to start looking around for an network device configuration management alternative. As is many times the way in the SMB space, this isn’t a task that actual budgetary dollars are going to go towards so off to Open Source land I went!  rConfig immediately caught my eye, looking to me like RANCID’s hipper, younger brother what with its built in web GUI (through which you can actually add your devices), scheduled tasks that don’t require you to manually edit cron, etc. The fact that rConfig specifically targets CentOS as its underlaying OS was just a whole other layer of awesomesauce on top of everything else. While rConfig’s website has a couple of really nice guides once you create a site login and use it, much to my dismay I found that they hadn’t been updated for CentOS 7 and while working through them I found that there are actually some pretty significant differences that effect the setup of rConfig. Some difference of minor (no more iptables, it’s firewalld) but it seems httpd has had a bit of an overhaul. Luckily I was not walking the virgin trail and through some …

VMworld 2015: What We Know So Far

As the first general keynote is wrapping up here in San Francisco I’ve been trying to keep track of what’s been announced this morning both in the keynote but also by way of the blogsphere. Long story short my take is there isn’t any thing new for the traditional vSphere customer, but if you are ready to start moving some of those workloads to the cloud there is going to be plenty of new things to enable what VMware is calling the hybrid cloud (repeatedly); the ability to support both your legacy apps (you know what we’re actually using) as well the new, shiny cloud native apps your developers are deploying at the speed of light. Please forgive the notes based format found below, but I wanted to get the information out there. Announcements so far: EVO SDDC Manager “Single Pain of Glass for managing all the hardware in your datacenter racks including EVO:Rail for compute, storage Partner networking devices for management, spine and top of rack Rack power distribution Covers vRealize Suite, NSX 6.2, VSAN 6.1, vSphere 6 Is this the EVO:Rack they hinted at last year? http://www.vmware.com/radius/vmworld-2015-the-end-of-the-beginning-lets-go/ Vmware Integrated OpenStack 2 Updates to the Kilo release, enabling features including Expanded language support Multi-region, multi-hypervisor support Load Balancing as a Service Autoscaling vSphere Integrated Containers & Photon Support Enables the truly hybrid cloud, with Photon/Bonneville/ESXi handling life under vCenter and Photon Machine powering your Cloud Native Apps Project SkyScraper; hybrid cloud capabilities for vSphere allowing for extending DC to …

So You’re Heading to VMworld 2015

Congrats on getting to go! Let’s start with that. VMworld 2015 along with the other major tech conferences are a very cool thing for the geek inclined in that they provide you, the geek, the necessary environment to mix business, pleasure and the absolute cutting edge of our chosen field.  Last year was my first VMworld and I have to say what I find very compelling about it is the element of community that seems to be everywhere surrounding the conference. It is not at all unusual to start your day at the conference in the morning and end it in the early hours of the next morning after a full night of community events and shindigs, many of which contain content just as valuable as what you get at the actual conference. If you are a first timer then this post is for  you as I’d like to pass on what I learned last year to save you some pain points and give you a heads up as to what I found valuable. If you are a veteran then maybe you’ll find something new here too, but in any case it’s always worth sharing information. Geography 101 (Click for full map): First off understand where you are staying and where you are going. Last year was my first time in San Francisco and while I found it a beautiful city the information provided on the VMworld hotel options list isn’t the fullest, frankly it needs to be topographical. If you are lucky …

Setting Up Endpoint Backup Access to Backup & Replication 8 Update 2 Repositories

A part of the Veeam Backup & Replication 8 Update 2 Release is the ability to allow users to target repositories specified in your Backup Infrastructure as targets for Endpoint Backup. While this is just one of many, many fixes and upgrades (hello vSphere 6!) in Update 2 this one is important for those looking to use Endpoint Backup in the enterprise as it allows for centralized storage and management and equally important is you also get e-mail notifications on these jobs. Once the update is installed you’ll have to decide what repository or repositories will be available to Endpoint Backup and provide permissions for users to access them. By default every Backup Repository Denies Endpoint Backup access to everyone. To change this for one or more repositories you’ll need to: Access the Backup Repositories section under Backup Infrastructure, then right click a repository and choose “Permissions.” Once there you have three options for each repository in regards to Endpoint permissions; Deny to everyone (default), Allow to everyone, and Allow to the following users or groups only. This last option is the most granular and what I use, even if just to select a large group. In the example shown I’ve provided access to the Domain Admins group. You will also notice that I’ve chosen to encrypt any backups stored in the repository, a nice feature as well of Veeam Backup & Replication 8. Also of note is that no user will be able to select a repository until they have access …

Getting Started with Veeam Endpoint Backup

This week Veeam Software officially released their new Endpoint Backup Free product introduced at VeeamON last October after a few months of beta testing. The target for this product is to allow image based backup of individual physical machines, namely workstations, allowing for Change Block Tracking much like users of their more mature Backup & Replication product have been used to in virtualized environments. Further Veeam has made a commitment that in the product is and should always be freely available making it possible for anybody to perform what is frankly enterprise level backup of their own computers with no cost other than possibly a external USB drive to store the backup data.  I’ve been using the product throughout the beta process and in this post I’ll outline some of the options and features and review how to get started with the product. Also released this month by Veeam is the related Update 2 for Backup & Replication 8. This update in this case allows a Backup Repository to be selected as a target for your Endpoint Backup job after some configuration as shown here. Keep in mind if you are wanting to backup to local USB or a network share this isn’t necessary but if you are already a B&R user this will make managing these backups much better. Getting Started with Installation I have to say Veeam did very well keeping the complexity under the water in this one. Once downloaded and run the installation choices consist completely …