From Zero to PowerCLI: CentOS Edition

Hi all, just a quicky to get everybody off the ground out there that are looking to use both PowerShell and PowerCLI from things that don’t run Windows. Today VMware released version 10 of PowerCLI with support for installation on both Linux and MacOS. This was made possible by the also recently released Powershell Core 6.0 which allows PowerShell to be installed on *nix variants. While the ability to run it on a Mac really doesn’t do anything for me I do like to use my iPad with a keyboard case as a quick and easy jump box and its frustrated me for a while that I needed to do an RDP session and then run a Powershell session from within that. With these releases I’m now an SSH session away from the vast majority of my scripting needs with normal sized text and everything. In this post I’ll cover getting both Powershell Core and PowerCLI installed on a CentOS VM. To be honest, installing both on any other variant is pretty trivial but the basic framework of the difference can be found in Microsoft Docs. Step 1: Installing Powershell Core 6.0 First, you need to add the Powershell Core repository to your yum configuration. You may need to amend the “/7/” below if you are running a RHEL 6 variant like CentOS 6.

Once you have your repo added simply install from yum

Congrats! You now have PowerShell on Linux. To run it simply run pwsh from …

VVOLs vs. the Expired Certificate

Hi all, I’m writing this to document a fix to an interesting challenge that has pretty much been my life for the last 24 hours or so. Through a comedy of errors and other things happening, we had a situation where the upstream CA from our VMware Certificate Authority (and other things) became very unavailable and the certificate authorizing it to manage certificates expired. Over the course of the last couple of days I’ve had to reissue certificates for just about everything including my Nimble Storage array and as far as vSphere goes we’ve had to revert all the certificate infrastructure to essentially the same as the out of the box self-signed guys and then reconfigure the VMCA as a subordinate again under the Root CA. Even after all that I continued to have an issue where my Production VVOLs storage was inaccessible to the hosts. That’s not to say they weren’t working, amazingly and as a testament to the design of how VVOLs works my VMs on it ran throughout the process, but I was very limited in terms of the management of those VMs. Snapshots didn’t work, backups didn’t work, for a time even host migrations didn’t work until we reverted to the self-signed certs. Thanks for a great deal of support and help from both VMware support and Nimble Storage Support we were finally able to come up with a runbook in dealing with a VVOL situation where major certificate changes occurred on the vSphere side. There …

VMworld 2017 US: T -2

I write this while traveling to sunny and amazingly hot Las Vegas for the 2017 edition of VMworld US. I hope to provide feedback and news throughout the conference, highlighting not only the excellent content and programs but also the best the virtualization community has to offer. Today will be a travel day as well as a day to meet up with friends, new and old. Tomorrow, the Sunday before the conference, is when the real fun begins with things like Opening Acts for me, TAM and partner content for others as well as a number of social events. What We Know So Far Yesterday was the day that Vmware went on a killing spree, announcing the depreciation of Windows based vCenter, the flash based vSphere web client and the vmkLinux APIs and its associated driver ecosystem. All of these enter the depreciated state with the next major version of vSphere and then will be gone for ever and ever in the revision after that. Each of these are significant steps towards the evolution of vSphere as we know it, and when coupled with the advances in PowerCLI in version 6.5 the management of our in house infrastructure has been changed for the better. These announcements came rapid fire on the Friday before Vmworld with the death of the Windows based vCenter coming first. As we have had versions of varying success of the vCenter Server Appliances (VCSA) for over 5 years now it’s been a long time coming. I …

A VMworld US 2017 To Do List

If you work in the virtualization or datacenter field (are they really different anymore?) you probably know that VMworld US 2017 is next week, August 27-31. While VMware may not be the only option out there when it comes to virtualization anymore VMworld is still the defacto event for people in the field. This conference’s definition of community is unrivaled in scope with just as much if not more going on outside of the conference agenda as  in it. As with all things worth doing conference attendance probably needs a checklist. Have you done yours? If not here are the high points of mine. I’m not going to bore you with “Jim will be attending session so and so”; well except for VMTN6699U and VMTN6700U you should totally join me at those sessions, but these are pretty general things I try to do each time. Take Your Vitamins– I hate to say it but the Vegas Flu is a real thing. Between being in the recirculated air of a jumbo jet for any number of hours to bookend event and being in the recirculated air of a Vegas hotel/casino/conference center I always seem to get at least a mild head cold at some point during the week. Start about now taking whatever version of Vitamin C supplement you like and do so throughout the event to help head this issue off. Bring Sharable Power- The average conference attendee has 3 devices on them at all times, phone, tablet and laptop. …

VMworld 2015: What We Know So Far

As the first general keynote is wrapping up here in San Francisco I’ve been trying to keep track of what’s been announced this morning both in the keynote but also by way of the blogsphere. Long story short my take is there isn’t any thing new for the traditional vSphere customer, but if you are ready to start moving some of those workloads to the cloud there is going to be plenty of new things to enable what VMware is calling the hybrid cloud (repeatedly); the ability to support both your legacy apps (you know what we’re actually using) as well the new, shiny cloud native apps your developers are deploying at the speed of light. Please forgive the notes based format found below, but I wanted to get the information out there. Announcements so far: EVO SDDC Manager “Single Pain of Glass for managing all the hardware in your datacenter racks including EVO:Rail for compute, storage Partner networking devices for management, spine and top of rack Rack power distribution Covers vRealize Suite, NSX 6.2, VSAN 6.1, vSphere 6 Is this the EVO:Rack they hinted at last year? http://www.vmware.com/radius/vmworld-2015-the-end-of-the-beginning-lets-go/ Vmware Integrated OpenStack 2 Updates to the Kilo release, enabling features including Expanded language support Multi-region, multi-hypervisor support Load Balancing as a Service Autoscaling vSphere Integrated Containers & Photon Support Enables the truly hybrid cloud, with Photon/Bonneville/ESXi handling life under vCenter and Photon Machine powering your Cloud Native Apps Project SkyScraper; hybrid cloud capabilities for vSphere allowing for extending DC to …

Where In The VMworld Is Jim?

Two weeks from today the official start to VMworld 2015 begins and to say I am excited to head out is a bit of an understatement. VMworld is a great place to learn more about a different branch of virtualization, see the bleeding edge of this technology and meet new people or renew conversations with some of the brightest minds in the industry. I myself will be focusing on VDI, specifically in the case of Disaster Recovery, and looking at Hyper-Converged systems this year along with all the other fun stuff. While this is only my second year going I’ve found that one of the biggest challenges to VMworld is schedule management; if you are interested in the social/community side of things you can very well go 20 hours a day Sunday through Thursday. Even with that you are going to be challenged to hit all the things you want because there is a great deal of overlap. With a paid conference attendance you (or VMUG Advantage membership) you will be able to view the vast majority of sessions online after the fact, but that doesn’t help with the get out and meet people stuff. Since by nature I am a schedule driven kind of guy I took some time this weekend to kind of map out the whats and the wheres to what I want to do and in hopes of getting to meet up with the 5 people who may read this blog I’ll throw a copy of …

vExpert 2015

The 2015 vExpert List was released today and I am honored to be on the list for the second year in a row. The vExpert program was developed to recognize those who active discuss and help others with VMware’s virtualization products in a number of ways, but notably through blogging and social media. To other vExperts that may be reading this please accept my hearty congratulations on your inclusion, whether it’s your first or your fifth time around. While it isn’t really the point, there are a number of benefits to being a vExpert with most of them compiled and listed by Romain Decker on his website. This can include anything from swag to free or heavily discounted training to NFR licenses for your home lab from many companies in the virtualization industry.  In truth what I’ve found to be the biggest benefit is getting to know, at least virtually, some exceptionally bright people in our field. If for some reason you either didn’t apply and or didn’t make the cut this time around and would like to be considered for inclusion there will be another round of applications this year but it hasn’t been announce yet. A best bet to be notified of when this opens would be to either follow the VMTN blog feed or the @vExpert twitter account.

What’s New in vSphere 6: Licensing

Today's release of vSphere 6 brings about quite a few new technologies worth getting excited for. This includes things such as Virtual Volumes (VVOLs), Open Stack Integration, global content library and long distance vMotion. Now for many of us, especially in the SMB space, the question is can we afford to play with them. As usual VMware very quietly released the licensing level breakout of these and other new features and I have to say my first take is this is another case of the rich getting richer. If you are already Enterprise Plus level licensed you are in great shape as everything discussed today except VSAN is included. Specifically this includes cross vCenter/ long distance vCenter Content Library vGPU VMware Integrated OpenStack While that's great and all and I applaud their development, they have quite a few other licensing levels that have been left out. Personally my installations are done at either Standard or Enterprise levels. The only major feature with across the product line support is VVOLs, which is nice but I honestly expected them to at least move some version 5 features such as Storage DRS down a notch to the Enterprise level and I figured the Content Library would maybe come in at the Essentials Plus level or Enterprise. As Mr. Geitner alluded to in his talk about half of all vSphere licenses are Enterprise Plus, my guess is the company really want to see that number grow. Here's to hoping that like vRAM this recent …

Managing your vSphere 6 Environment

VMware released their long awaited version 6 of its vSphere 6 products today and as I’m sure you’ll be running out tomorrow to go update all your production environments…. Ok now that we’re done laughing what you probably are going to want to get into is getting your lab updated or built so you can work out the changes yourself, possibly using your EvalExperience licenses you got with VMUG Advantage? Once you get it up and running you’ll notice that a few things have changed from the administration point of view. In this post I’m going to take a quick look at the Management features of vSphere 6. Platform Services Controller One thing you’ll find right off is that many of the underlying vCenter services have now been lumped together into what they are calling the Platform Services Controller. These services include Single Sign-On, licensing and certificate management.  At installation you are given two options on how to deploy the PSC, either embedded, where the PSC always rides along with vCenter, or External where the PSC is installed on its own VM and each vCenter talks back to the central services controller. There are a couple of design requirements here if you chose to go the embedded route. You can have a maximum of 8 embedded or external PSCs per Single Sign-On site, and if you choose to go the embedded route it will increase the minimum RAM required to 8 GB. vSphere Web Client As has been the trend …

VMware’s Big February 2nd Announcement

VMware will be having a big announcement event next week, most likely regarding the public release of their vSphere 6 suite of products. Version 6 has been in a “private” beta that anyone can join for the past 5 months or so and looks to include various features to move the product along. The beta program is still open for enrollment with the latest version being an RC build, you can sign up here to gain access to the bits themselves but also various documents and recorded webinars regarding the new features. Just going by what was discussed at VMworld 2014 what is included in this version includes Virtual Volumes: A VMware/Storage vendor interoperability technology that masks much of the complexity of storage management from the vSphere administrator and makes the storage more virtualization-centric than it already is. There is a lot of information out there on this already available through the power of Google, but the product announcement on the VMware blogs is nice and concise. The death of the fat VI Client: This is the release where we are supposed to be going whole hog on the vSphere Web Client. Can you feel the enthusiasm I have for this? vMotion Enhancements: One feature really worth getting worked up for is the ability to across the both vCenters and datacenters, neither of which was possible in the past. This is great news. Multi-CPU VM Fault Tolerance: While the fault tolerance feature, the ability to have in essence a replica …