From Zero to PowerCLI: CentOS Edition

Hi all, just a quicky to get everybody off the ground out there that are looking to use both PowerShell and PowerCLI from things that don’t run Windows. Today VMware released version 10 of PowerCLI with support for installation on both Linux and MacOS. This was made possible by the also recently released Powershell Core 6.0 which allows PowerShell to be installed on *nix variants. While the ability to run it on a Mac really doesn’t do anything for me I do like to use my iPad with a keyboard case as a quick and easy jump box and its frustrated me for a while that I needed to do an RDP session and then run a Powershell session from within that. With these releases I’m now an SSH session away from the vast majority of my scripting needs with normal sized text and everything. In this post I’ll cover getting both Powershell Core and PowerCLI installed on a CentOS VM. To be honest, installing both on any other variant is pretty trivial but the basic framework of the difference can be found in Microsoft Docs. Step 1: Installing Powershell Core 6.0 First, you need to add the Powershell Core repository to your yum configuration. You may need to amend the “/7/” below if you are running a RHEL 6 variant like CentOS 6.

Once you have your repo added simply install from yum

Congrats! You now have PowerShell on Linux. To run it simply run pwsh from …

VMworld 2017 US: T -2

I write this while traveling to sunny and amazingly hot Las Vegas for the 2017 edition of VMworld US. I hope to provide feedback and news throughout the conference, highlighting not only the excellent content and programs but also the best the virtualization community has to offer. Today will be a travel day as well as a day to meet up with friends, new and old. Tomorrow, the Sunday before the conference, is when the real fun begins with things like Opening Acts for me, TAM and partner content for others as well as a number of social events. What We Know So Far Yesterday was the day that Vmware went on a killing spree, announcing the depreciation of Windows based vCenter, the flash based vSphere web client and the vmkLinux APIs and its associated driver ecosystem. All of these enter the depreciated state with the next major version of vSphere and then will be gone for ever and ever in the revision after that. Each of these are significant steps towards the evolution of vSphere as we know it, and when coupled with the advances in PowerCLI in version 6.5 the management of our in house infrastructure has been changed for the better. These announcements came rapid fire on the Friday before Vmworld with the death of the Windows based vCenter coming first. As we have had versions of varying success of the vCenter Server Appliances (VCSA) for over 5 years now it’s been a long time coming. I …

Setting Up External Access To A Veeam SureBackup Virtual Lab

Hey y’all, happy Friday! One of the things that seems to still really fly under the radar in regards to Veeam Backup & Replication is its SureBackup feature. This feature is designed to allow for automated testing via scripts of groups of your backups. An example would be if you have a critical web application. You can create an application group that includes both the database server and the web server and when the SureBackup job is run Veeam will connect a section of its backup repository to a specified ESXi host as a datastore and, start the VMs within a NAT protected segment of your vSphere infrastructure, run either the role based scripts included or custom ones you specify to ensure that the VMs are connecting to the applications correctly, and then when done shut the lab down and fire off an e-mail. That workflow is great an all but it only touches on the edge of the power of what SureBackup can do for you. In our environment not only do we have a mandate to provide backup tests that allow for end-user interaction, but we also use SureBackup for test bed type applications such as patch tests. An example of the latter here is when I was looking to upgrade our internal Windows-based CA to Server 2012 R2. I was able to launch the server in the lab, perform the upgrade and ensure that it behaved as expected WITHOUT ANY IMPACT ON PRODUCTION first and then tear down …

Fun with the vNIC Shuffle with Cisco UCS

Here at This Old Datacenter we’ve recently made the migration to using Cisco UCS for our production compute resources. UCS offers a great number of opportunity for system administrators, both in deployment as well as on going maintenance, making updating the physical as manageable as we virtualization admins are getting used to with the virtualized layer of the DC. Of course like any other deployment there is always going to be that one “oh yeah, that” moment. In my case after I had my servers up I realized I needed another virtual NIC, or vNIC in UCS world. This shouldn’t be a big deal because a big part of what UCS does for you is it abstracts the hardware configuration away from the actual hardware. For those more familiar with standard server infrastructure, instead of having any number of physical NIC in the back of the host for specific uses (iSCSI, VM traffic, specialized networking, etc) you have a smaller number of connections as part of the Fabric Interconnect to the blade chassis that are logically split to provide networking to the individual blades. These Fabric Interconnects (FI) not only have multiple very high-speed connections (10 or 40 GbE) but each chassis typically will have multiple FI to provide redundancy throughout the design. All this being said, here’s a very basic design utilizing a UCS Mini setup with Nexus 3000 switches and a copper connected storage array: So are you starting to thing this is a UCS geeksplainer? No, no …

VMware Tools Security Bug and Finding which VMware Tools components are installed on all VMs

Just a quick post related to today’s VMware security advisories. VMware released a pair of advisories today, CVE-2016-5330 and CVE-2016-5331 and while both are nasty their scopes are somewhat limited. The 5331 issue is only applicable if you are running vCenter or ESXi 6.0 or 6.0U1, Update 2 patches the bug. The 5330 is limited to Windows VMs, running VMware Tools, and have the option HGFS component installed. To find out if you are vulnerable here’s a Power-CLI script to get all your VMs and list the installed components. Props to Jason Shiplett for giving me some assistance on the code.

While the output is still a little rough it will get you there. Alternatively if you are just using this script for the advisory listed you can change  where-object { $_.Name -match $componentPattern }  to  where-object { $_.Name -match "vmhgfs" } . This script is also available on GitHub.

What’s New in vSphere 6: Licensing

Today's release of vSphere 6 brings about quite a few new technologies worth getting excited for. This includes things such as Virtual Volumes (VVOLs), Open Stack Integration, global content library and long distance vMotion. Now for many of us, especially in the SMB space, the question is can we afford to play with them. As usual VMware very quietly released the licensing level breakout of these and other new features and I have to say my first take is this is another case of the rich getting richer. If you are already Enterprise Plus level licensed you are in great shape as everything discussed today except VSAN is included. Specifically this includes cross vCenter/ long distance vCenter Content Library vGPU VMware Integrated OpenStack While that's great and all and I applaud their development, they have quite a few other licensing levels that have been left out. Personally my installations are done at either Standard or Enterprise levels. The only major feature with across the product line support is VVOLs, which is nice but I honestly expected them to at least move some version 5 features such as Storage DRS down a notch to the Enterprise level and I figured the Content Library would maybe come in at the Essentials Plus level or Enterprise. As Mr. Geitner alluded to in his talk about half of all vSphere licenses are Enterprise Plus, my guess is the company really want to see that number grow. Here's to hoping that like vRAM this recent …

VMware’s Big February 2nd Announcement

VMware will be having a big announcement event next week, most likely regarding the public release of their vSphere 6 suite of products. Version 6 has been in a “private” beta that anyone can join for the past 5 months or so and looks to include various features to move the product along. The beta program is still open for enrollment with the latest version being an RC build, you can sign up here to gain access to the bits themselves but also various documents and recorded webinars regarding the new features. Just going by what was discussed at VMworld 2014 what is included in this version includes Virtual Volumes: A VMware/Storage vendor interoperability technology that masks much of the complexity of storage management from the vSphere administrator and makes the storage more virtualization-centric than it already is. There is a lot of information out there on this already available through the power of Google, but the product announcement on the VMware blogs is nice and concise. The death of the fat VI Client: This is the release where we are supposed to be going whole hog on the vSphere Web Client. Can you feel the enthusiasm I have for this? vMotion Enhancements: One feature really worth getting worked up for is the ability to across the both vCenters and datacenters, neither of which was possible in the past. This is great news. Multi-CPU VM Fault Tolerance: While the fault tolerance feature, the ability to have in essence a replica …

Thoughts on the vSphere 6 Open Beta

Ahead of its annual Vmworld conference (which I will be attending this year, yay!) VMware has announced the version 6.0 of its vSphere line of products including ESXi, vCenter and just about every other VMware related topic I’ve written about here.  The company has chosen to mix it up a little bit this year in that they have made the beta program itself public, but in joining the actual program you are required to sign a NDA keeping anything you learn private. To me I take this to mean that while the wire structure is there this is still very much a work in progress, with the community at large having the opportunity to greatly influence what we are going to be seeing in the final product. As I cannot directly talk about anything I’m learning from the beta itself I highly recommend anybody with a little space to lab go sign up for the beta, start providing feedback and try it out for yourself. Instead what I’m going to discuss here is my wish list for things to be included when 6.0 finally hits gold as well as the basics of the long discussed Virtual Volumes product that was released into beta along with vSphere. Wish List As I mentioned above, the beta for vSphere 6 requires a non-disclosure agreement, even if it is open to the public.  To learn what is actually coming in vSphere 6 I urge you to go join the beta for yourself as there …